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Inspiring and Supporting Photographers of Australian Birds

Common Myna

Common Myna (Image ID 46571)
Photographed byMichael Hamel-Green on Sat 5th Jun, 2021 and uploaded on same date.
Resolution1800x1110
Viewed53
ID46571
CommentFearless birds, no wonder they have been so successful in occupying much of Asia and the southeastern and eastern parts of Australia. Here is one living dangerously, perched on a suburban railway line, one of an aerial platoon that moves round Royal Park, semaphoring to each other with their constantly-flashing white-panelled wings, their way of keeping in touch with each other and signalling to whom it may be of concern that they best stand aside. This flock seemed to be repairing to the railway line whenever people passed by on the adjoining footpath. Presumably they would sense the vibrations of any oncoming train and make a timely escape. Mynahs are certainly birds with bucket loads of attitude, rarely giving ground to competitors. A friend has recounted how they recently attacked his beleaguered cat, who was forced to make a hasty retreat, something of a role reversal in the normal pattern of things. They are all too common, especially around the streets and parks here in Melbourne, but no doubt Mynah ubiquity is a testament to their adaptability, assertiveness, and collective mobilization to meet any threat or challenge. Unfortunately, their very assertiveness is believed to be a threat to many of our native bird species, whose nests they usurp and eggs destroy. However, the RSPCA says Common Mynahs are not actually identified as a threat to any of the priority birds on our nationalThreatened Species List, that the scale of their potentially adverse impacts needs to be demonstrated through research, and that, generally speaking, they do not recommend culling Mynahs but rather undertaking efforts to expand urban natural habitats with the aim of enhancing a diversity of bird species (https://kb.rspca.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Management-of-common-Indian-myna-birds-RSPCA-Information-Paper-July-2017.pdf). As for my Mynah, living dangerously on my local railway line, I can’t help admiring the sparkles in his eyes, his evident self-confidence, and his glossy black hood, gleaming in the morning sun. Perhaps other species will need to learn the Mynah lesson: Mynahs united will never be defeated.
EquipmentNikon Z7ii, Nikon 300mm PF f4, TC1.4, focal length 420mm
ISO 1250
1/1600th f5.6
LocationRoyal Park, Parkville, Victoria
Keywordsadult
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