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Inspiring and Supporting Photographers of Australian Birds

Yellow-tufted Honeyeater

Yellow-tufted Honeyeater (Image ID 45980)
Photographed byMichael Hamel-Green on Mon 26th Apr, 2021 and uploaded on Wed 5th May, 2021 .
Resolution1033x1400
Viewed133
ID45980
CommentAmidst the melee of honeyeaters to be discovered at this time of year in the Box-Ironbark habit around Lake Crusoe near Bendigo are Yellow-Tufted Honeyeaters, famed for a number of reasons. According to John Gould (Birds of Australia Vol.IV), the species is “certainly one of the most beautiful” of its genus, especially its “ornamental ear-coverts”, and found it “extremely interesting to observe how closely its (plumage) assimilates in colour to that of the flowers and leaves of the trees which they inhabit”. This Yellow-tufted is from the smaller and more common meltoni subspecies, with its less prominent ear tufts. Its black face mask stands out against it yellow throat and cap, and the triangular yellow ear tuft can be seen between its yellow helmet and grey-olive upperparts. Its cassidix cousin is better known as the Helmeted Honeyeater, a larger and critically endangered Yellow-tufted subspecies, which, for very deserved reasons, has become Victoria’s official bird emblem. There are only now about 40 left in the wild. The Victorian Government is supporting programs to increase its numbers at two locations in the central east of Victoria, one at Yellingbo Reserve. Threats, even at its remaining Yellingbo habitat, include competition with Bell Miners and predation from foxes and feral cats, with past decline in Helmeted Honeyeater populations due to destruction of its habitat by agricultural land clearance and bushfire zones recolonized by competing Bell Miners (Action Plan for Australian Birds 2010, p.356). Current efforts to save the bird from extinction continue to be mounted by the Helmeted Honeyeater Recovery Team and the Friends of the Helmeted Honeyeater group, including plans to save the bird in future bushfire contingencies. There are so many saints in the bird protection community. No doubt our remaining lonely band of Helmeted Honeys are whistling their “tooey-t tooey-t” thank you calls whenever they see these saints helping them recover at Yellingbo.
EquipmentNikon Z7ii, Nikon 300mm PF f420, Nikon TC1.4
420mm
ISO 2000
1/640th f5.6
LocationCrusoe Reservoir near Bendigo, Victoria
Keywordsadult
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