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Inspiring and Supporting Photographers of Australian Birds

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White-eared Honeyeater

White-eared Honeyeater (Image ID 45958)
Photographed byMichael Hamel-Green on Mon 26th Apr, 2021 and uploaded on Mon 3rd May, 2021 .
Resolution978x1400
Viewed67
ID45958
Comment“April is the cruellest month” wrote T.S.Eliot in “The Wasteland”, not long after all the death and destruction of WW1. He was thinking, perhaps, of how bereft survivors of the Great War would feel without their lost loved ones at their side as the northern spring arrives, normally a time of hope. Down under, autumnal April could also be the cruellest month for Australian birdwatchers as they begin to miss, or see far fewer of, so many birds whose habitats were destroyed in recent climate-induced cataclysmic bushfires and floods, including our most critically affected Swift Parrots, Regent Honeyeaters, and Lyrebirds. Of course, some regions were less affected than others, and the Box-Ironbark hinterlands of Bendigo have been more fortunate than most. Walking around a bend at Crusoe Reservoir in the last week of April, I met another birdwatcher, trademark binoculars clutched in one hand, zoom lens camera in the other. She was so excited she could hardly contain herself. “I have never seen so many honeyeaters. The trees are alive with them. I saw at least six different honeyeaters. Clouds of honeyeaters! I could hardly believe my eyes”. And with that, she was off again to join the fray. As I progressed around the lakeside, I came upon the manic honeyeater explosion she was talking about, with the birds zooming and zipping through the eucalypt canopy with incessant chirps and cheeps and contact calls: “Follow me, follow me!…Yes, yes, I’m coming!”. April and May are, of course, the time when Ironbarks and White Boxes are flowering most prolifically. The honeyeaters were losing no time in enjoying such bounty. Not being quite as experienced as my excited fellow birdwatcher, I was only able to see three different honeyeaters in the melee, a White-eared, a Yellow-Tufted, and a Yellow-faced Honeyeater. Here is the White-eared one, with its greyish cap, black face and neck, and its white ear patch, striking a very perky pose. So, for Bendigo birdwatchers at least, April was the kindest month!
EquipmentNikon Z7ii, Nikon 300mm PF f420, Nikon TC1.4
420mm
ISO 2000
1/1250th f6.3
LocationCrusoe Reservoir near Bendigo, Victoria
Keywordsadult
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