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Inspiring and Supporting Photographers of Australian Birds

Australian Reed-Warbler

Australian Reed-Warbler (Image ID 43349)
Photographed byMichael Hamel-Green on Mon 9th Nov, 2020 and uploaded on Tue 10th Nov, 2020 .
Resolution1400x945
Viewed49
ID43349
CommentAn Australian Reed-Warbler doing what a Reed-Warbler does best, warbling in the reeds, in this case in the Royal Park Wetlands. In earlier times, as little as a year ago, in my blissful cluelessness as a novice twitcher, I would go past this same stretch of reeds, see no birds, and wonder to myself why these wetlands were so recommended as a great bird watching spot in the heart of Melbourne. Nowadays, I take a little more trouble to listen to the insights of experienced birdwatchers, and am constantly amazed at my own previous blindness to all the birdlife that is actually out there. I try to heed the experts’ counsel of first listening, then locating, then waiting patiently and inconspicuously for the bird to suddenly (or belatedly) appear. This is exactly what happened here. I heard but did not see this Reed-Warbler in a large clump of reeds off to my right, so I waited, and waited, and waited, and - testing my admittedly limited patience - waited just one moment more, and the Warbler suddenly erupted from the reeds and flew across to perch in some reeds almost facing where I was standing. To my delight, it started up its warbling again, chup-chup dzee dzee quarty-quarty-quartly, as Menkhorst el.al. perfectly mimic the more melodious of their warblings. So what do they have to sing about? According to Menkhorst, they sing all day and into the night during breeding season. This, of course, is their breeding season, having come down from northern parts to raise a family in our more congenial Southern climatic conditions. So no doubt they are singing out of joy in starting their new family. No one has as yet dared to tell Reed-Warblers about the climate crisis, and how sojourning down South may not be such a good idea after all, especially after what happened last summer. But sing away, Warbler, before all singing, yours and ours, is over.
EquipmentNikon Z7 with Nikon 300mm PF f/4 telephoto
ISO 1250
1/3200th f8
LocationRoyal Park Wetlands, Parkville, Victoria
Keywordsadult
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